Posts Tagged ‘Kevin Newsome’

Sometimes, no matter how hard you try, you can’t always get your team or your board all in the same place at the same time. That’s when you need to call a professional photographer who is experienced at “group composite photos.”

A group composite photo is a single photograph that has been created, using more than one image. Essentially, adding one or more individuals to a group photograph when they weren’t really there when the group photo was taken – and doing so convincingly.

Newsome’s Studio has been creating group composites for years, and has found more than one reason they’re great for business. Law firms, Dr offices, Insurance companies, and many other places of business may want a group photo taken for their “Meet the Team” page on their company website. If they ARE lucky enough to assemble everyone in one place for a photo, it is rare that everyone looks their absolute best – all at the same time – in ONE PHOTO! And even if they do, within a year or less, someone leaves the firm, someone gets transferred out of state, someone gets terminated, and BOOM!… the group photo is suddenly rendered useless!

Kevin Newsome has solved this problem for several businesses in recent years. He has photographed the team, board, and staff photo of as many of 20 individuals – separately – and composited them into one “near-perfect” group photo. When one partner leaves the firm, no problem. Delete them and add the new person in their spot, avoiding the need to re-photograph the entire group, saving the firm HUNDREDS of dollars!

group-composite-QCG

Quality Consulting Group

group-composite-strategis

Strategis CPAs & Consulting

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West Tampa Chamber of Commerce

group-composite-CABA

Carrollwood Area Business Association

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Up until now, I’d only been to two presidential campaign speeches in my life; Obama in 2008, and Nixon in 1968. This was my third.

Donald Trump is leading in the polls. That’s why I went. That’s why I went to see Obama in ’08, as well. I wanted pics, that’s it. I’ve never in my life seen a “sitting” President in person, only “eventual” Presidents. Will Trump reach that rank? Who knows?

Trump is running what I would characterize as a “Bullworth” style campaign. Unconventional, unorthodox, and unapologetic. He’s brash, crude, unpolished, and quite confident. I might even suspect that he says the things he does, because he doesn’t really want to be President. He keeps assuming that by alienating or insulting entire races or classifications of people, he’ll drop in the polls and not be forced to actually build that wall. But confounding everyone – including him – it seems to have the opposite affect!

So, in true Trump form, a campaign speech in the home of Ringling Bros, was destined to have all the makings of a circus.

elephants

And what would a circus be without an elephant? I bet the GOP wish they’d thought of this.

There were certainly plenty of promotional products to purchase. I can’t swear to it, but I’d guess that Trump’s campaign is being financed by the revenue stream generated through these items. He’s not stupid, if there’s money to be made, he’ll get his share.

buttons

There were buttons. Lots and lots of buttons.

hats

There were hats. Yes, those hats.

shirts1

And of course, there were plenty of shirts.

shirts2

Even shirts that have nothing whatsoever to do with Trump. 🙂

stuff

Stuff. Just lots of stuff.

petitions

Petitions abound… solar power?… term limits?…

petitions2

“Sorry, no free samples today, just sign the petition please.”

cellphones

So… let’s talk about the banning of campaign signs in the mosh pit… Cellphones, well… okay, but NO IPADS! That just LOOKS stupid, okay?

I arrived early enough to stake out a spot about 50 feet from the podium, right in the middle. I held that spot for two hours before he arrived. My legs were killing me, so I knew I would only stay there until I’d gotten a decent close up of him, then maneuver to another, more comfortable spot. But getting a decent shot from the mosh pit proved difficult.

trump1

That hat. That hat needs to be turned around, so the bill doesn’t cast a shadow on his eyes. At least that’s what every photographer would say.

My wife says that he always looks like someone just pulled a pacifier out of his mouth. She has a point.

When I left the mosh pit, I moved to the back of the room where I spotted a line of media badged photographers racing past me and up the right side aisle. I was wearing my 20 year old Domke camera vest, so I fit right in. I waited until the last one passed, then jumped in behind them and picked up the pace. I felt like the Tin Man sneaking into the Witch’s castle behind her guard. They continued all the way back to the right front and behind a curtain. I stopped short of the curtain and was 90 degrees from Trump. I didn’t know what was behind the curtain, but I was certain it wouldn’t be good if I got busted back there.

trump2

It was from here that, only a feet away, a female protester started shouting at Trump.

I had my 28-70mm in my utility pouch, and my 70-200mm was on my camera (Nikon D750). The protester was 8-10 feet away and I didn’t have time to change lenses. Instead of photographing her, I switched to video mode and attempted to film the ruckus with the 70mm setting. The crowd was booing quite loud, so you can’t understand what she was saying, but here’s the unedited, two minute video I captured.

After this mess, I was run off by security for being a fire hazard (standing in the aisle), so I ran up the steps to get another shot from above.

trump3

As soon as I took this shot, security came at me again for being on the steps (not in a seat). Oop, sorry, my bad…

When I got to the back of the room again, I was hanging out and observing the press from behind their vantage point behind the risers. I took one photo, when I was suddenly approached by an attractive, young (20 something) woman with the campaign. She immediately asked what news media I was with (camera vest, remember?). I told her “none.” She then asked if I was with the campaign… “nope.”
“Well then, you can’t be in here.”
“In where?”
“In the campaign hall.”
“Excuse me? Why?”
“Because of that camera.”
“But everyone in here has a camera, are you going to throw them out too?”
“But yours looks expensive.”
Me: <eyeblink>
About that time, an old photography friend and FPP member, Thomas Bender, approached from inside the media section. He was there working for the Sarasota Herald Tribune and quickly intervened and vouched for me to the young lady. Simultaneously, a Trump VIP (George) also had approached and asked for my business card. When Tom spoke up, George became my best friend and offered me a spot on the media podium – BOOM! (It pays to belong the FPP!). Not only am I now “allowed to be in here,” I’m playing with the big boys (and I’m referring to their lenses, btw).

trump4

Then Trump saw me, waved a thumbs up, and the crowd cheered and smiled for my camera… okay, that’s not really what happened, but it kinda felt that way.

So after a while up on the media stand, I was ready to find a seat. The only one I knew was available was the one in my car. I’d heard Trump speak of building a wall; he’d listed all the states he’s leading in; and he dissed Obama for being concerned about global warming instead of ISIS (not sure why he’s campaigning against Obama, does he know he’s not eligible to be re-elected?).  I’d heard enough.

I’m not typically a political guy. I’ve voted in every election, but I know better than to openly state my views online – it only leads to trouble. In Trump’s case, I can see how he appeals to his audience (everyone has an audience). I’m not quite sure how his style would be viewed by other global leaders and their audiences (I don’t hold a lot of hope that it’d be very good), but one thing’s for certain… he has a shot at winning and if “change” is what you’re looking for, Trump is NOT a politician. Like, at all. Good luck with that.

I LOVE Nashville! Fortunately, I’ve had the pleasure of visiting there several times over the past few years, and have always enjoyed myself.

This trip was to document a three day event for Interior Design Magazine. It was a gathering of some of the country’s top designers and suppliers who are actively designing hotels and restaurants across the country. Programming is often followed by bus tours of local hotels and restaurants that have been designed as boutique/chic/hip, or have become local icons for their designs.

Dinner music at the Ryman was supplied a country music trio, who played every song you already know the words to!

Dinner music at the Ryman was supplied a country music trio, who played every song you already know the words to!

Nashville designer, Hannah Crowell (daughter of Roseanne Cash) presented "Little Known Facts About Nashville" to the attendees.

Nashville designer, Hannah Crowell (daughter of Rosanne Cash) presented “Little Known Facts About Nashville” to the attendees.

Dinner one evening was held on stage at the Ryman Auditorium.

Dinner one evening was held on stage at the Ryman Auditorium.

Designer Andrew Dent presented on how technology is employed into futuristic designs.

Designer Andrew Dent presented on how technology is employed into futuristic designs.

Photoshop World 2015, Las Vegas

Photoshop World 2015, Las Vegas

Providing professional photography coverage for a three day convention is exhausting all by itself. Add to that, the convention is attended by several thousand photographers, and it takes on a whole new level of pressure and stress. And when the convention is the well known, Photoshop World and held in Las Vegas, you’re more than flattered that you’ve been asked to be their official photographer, and handed the task of creating images that will used to dress up their website, and market their next convention.

Industry Icon, Jay Maisel

Industry Icon, Jay Maisel

The speakers at this convention are some of the industry’s biggest names, and not just running the “speaker circuit,” but icons that are consistently creating great images over a long storied career.

Dave Black

Dave Black

Joel Grimes

Joel Grimes

Joe McNally

Joe McNally

Jason Groupp

Jason Groupp

Peter Hurley

Peter Hurley

Glyn Dewis

Glyn Dewis

David Ziser

David Ziser

 

Adobe Guru, Julianne Kost

Adobe Guru, Julianne Kost

The party at Photoshop World.

The party at Photoshop World.

Jack Reznicki

Jack Reznicki

Scott Kelby on the strings.

Scott Kelby on the strings.

Rebel Soul rocked the party.

Rebel Soul rocked the party.

Scott Kelby joined the band at the party and shredded a guitar!

Scott Kelby joined the band at the party and shredded a guitar!

Scott Kelby, Founder of KelbyOne Media

Scott Kelby, Founder of KelbyOne Media

To get out of the studio and dropped into an uncontrolled lighting environment, with the directive of capturing images that truly tell the story of an event; speakers and presenters, attendees, environment, and details – THAT’S my goal.

I’ve been fortunate enough to have been dropped into several environments, mostly in incredible locations – Chicago, Austin, Dallas, Miami Beach, Orlando, Palm Springs, and most recently, New Orleans. When you successfully fill the needs of a high powered client and develop a mutual trust in one another, the results are magical and the relationship continues to grow. These are just a few of my favorite images from October’s event coverage for Interior Design Magazine in New Orleans.

Bryan Batt, Mad Men actor, Design Maven, Author

Bryan Batt, Mad Men actor, Design Maven, Author

Second Line Parade to Arnaud's, led by Cindy Allen, Editor in Chief of Interior Design Magazine.

Second Line Parade to Arnaud’s, led by Cindy Allen, Editor in Chief of Interior Design Magazine.

Bananas Foster at Arnaud's.

Bananas Foster at Arnaud’s.

Chef John Besh of New Orleans.

Chef John Besh of New Orleans.

Personal guided tour by Blain Kern of Kern's Float Den.

Personal guided tour by Blain Kern of Kern’s Float Den.

Cocktails at the New Orleans Pharmacy Museum

Cocktails at the New Orleans Pharmacy Museum

Have you ever seen such a beautiful child? (besides your own, of course). A classic traditional portrait study of a child, done in the studio, can take as long as 90 minutes or as little as twenty, depends on the age and cooperation level of the child. In this case, she was part of a session that included her two older brothers, but in typical fashion, we created a few images on each child alone after we’d achieved our goals on them together.

Loved this 3/4 profile image of her, and sculpted her face with the lighting beautifully.

Classic Traditional Studio Portrait Study of a Child

Classic Traditional Studio Portrait Study of a Child

Had a second senior picture session with Mallory, this time on location. Netted several incredible images (how could I not?), and am posting a few of them here. We are not the school’s official yearbook photographer, but that won’t stop seniors from seeking us out when they want something the yearbook photographer may not able to provide. Enjoy!

The tractor just happened to be there, but the three crosses in the background were the motivation for selecting this site.

The tractor just happened to be there, but the three crosses in the background were the motivation for selecting this site.

An open field of wildflowers (I really have no idea what kind they are), are always a bonus to use as a background (not to mention a hair ornament!).

An open field of wildflowers (I really have no idea what kind they are), are always a bonus to use as a background (not to mention a hair ornament!).